Tag Archives: Periodontal Disease

Can Dental Bonding Help Cover My Gum Recession?

Receding gums can make you conscious about your smile and can affect your self-esteem. To say that it can be scary experience is only fitting. Luckily, there are several treatment options available at your dentist’s clinic to help fix this problem, one of which is dental bonding.

What Is Dental Bonding?

Dental bonding is a dental procedure that involves the application of a composite resin to repair decayed, chipped, fractured and discolored teeth. For aesthetic purposes, the bonding is created to be that of the same shade as that of a patient’s surrounding teeth.

The procedure is considered as one of the cheapest and least-intrusive dental procedures available today. Although often used for cosmetic purposes, dental bonding has several functional benefits too. For example, the bonding material can be used to close tooth gaps, and change the shape of the teeth. Additionally, it can also be used as a cosmetic alternative to fillings.

The bonding can also be applied to the exposed areas on the tooth’s root caused by gum recession. This can help provide necessary protection to the roots and prevent cavities from forming. Even better, the bonding can also help address any sensitivity issues that may be caused by the roots being exposed because of gum recession.

Furthermore, for aesthetic purposes, bonded composite fillings can also be used to mask darker yellow-colored roots found in gaps between the gums and the crowns of the bridge.

Is It A Permanent Solution?

Unfortunately, applying bonding at the gumline is more of a cosmetic and temporary solution than anything else. Case in point, your gums may have receded because you brush your teeth too hard. Or, your parents also had gum recession, so you were born with a higher risk for receding gums. Either way, dental bonding cannot solve both problems, and you’re better off discussing things thoroughly with your dentist if you’re looking for a permanent solution to your receding gums.

Other Treatment Options

Of course, dental bonding is but one of the many treatments available for gum recession, and is considered to be mostly just cosmetic. If your gum recession is caused by poor oral health, it’s more likely that you’ll need to work with a dentist who specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of gum disease, otherwise known as a periodontist. This is because your teeth and gums might require a deeper cleaning known as scaling and root planning.

Although very rare, it’s also possible for those with gum recession to require surgical treatment, specifically a gum graft. Also done by a periodontist, the surgical procedure involves grafting the gum tissue to cover exposed root surfaces and prevent further complications.

If you’re only mildly affected by receding gums, then you don’t have to worry much. The dentist will simply help identify the cause and give you instructions on how to treat it.

If you want to minimize your risk for gum recession, then be sure to take care of your oral health. Use a toothbrush with soft bristles, be gentle on your teeth when brushing and flossing and wear a night guard if you grind your teeth. Also, visit Dr. George Kirtley as soon as you experience any kind of persistent pain. Call for an appointment today at 317-841-1111. Or visit the website at www.smilesbygeorge.com.

 

 

Can Periodontal Disease Be Cured?

periodontal disease

Healthy gums are firm and pale pink. If they’re puffy or red and bleed much more easily, then it is possible that you’re suffering from gingivitis, the most common form of periodontal disease. Although seldom painful, gingivitis shouldn’t be taken lightly. If left unchecked, gingivitis can spread to the ligaments and bones below the gums, becoming what’s known as periodontitis.

Without treatment, periodontitis can wreak serious damage on your teeth and gums, to the point that the infection causes a very painful tooth abscess and even make your tooth become loose and fall out.

Given how serious periodontal disease is, one might ask, can it be cured?

Treatable, But Not Curable

There are generally just two types of periodontal disease – gingivitis and periodontitis. Of the two, the former is a mild form and it is treatable with proper dental treatment in the dental office and good oral care at home. However, there is no cure anymore once gingivitis progresses to periodontitis.

Patients who develop severe periodontal disease, or periodontitis, will require extensive treatment at the dental office. This usually involves a special cleaning to remove plaque and tartar deposits on the tooth and root surfaces called scaling and root planning, or sometimes referred to as deep cleaning. Medication to help control the infection and pain, as well as to aid the healing process are also necessary. Other treatments may also be involved as well, especially if some, if not all, of the teeth have been severely infected, or in worse cases, have fallen out already.

The extensive treatment process can take months. It’s also quite expensive as well, especially if you don’t have dental insurance. Even worse, once you’ve had periodontal disease, your dentist will recommend you more frequent dental checkups. This is because periodontitis is something that can’t be cured, it can only be managed and kept under control via regular dental visits, deep cleanings and by practicing good oral hygiene at home.

Prevention Is Better Than Cure

As complicated and as severe as periodontal disease is, you don’t necessarily have to suffer from it. Gingivitis can easily be prevented by following a program of good dental hygiene, one that begins at home and at an early age.

A good dental hygiene routine to follow is to brush your teeth at least twice a day and floss at least once. It would be an even better idea to brush your teeth after every meal. Brushing alone, though, isn’t enough, as you have to make sure that you do it effectively and thoroughly. It’s recommended that you take at least three to five minutes to brush and floss your teeth. Also, remember to floss first before brushing to help clean away any loose food particles and bacteria that may be lodged in between your teeth.

Most important of all, don’t forget to see your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and checkups. Although the frequency may vary, dentists do recommend getting a dental checkup as often as every six months to one year. Call today to schedule your checkup with Dr. George Kirtley at 317-841-1111.

What is Gingivitis? | Indianapolis, Il Dentist

Smiling woman with perfect teethGingivitis is one of those things none of us want to hear we have. Hearing you have gingivitis can be embarrassing, since it probably means you haven’t been keeping up with your home oral care. Gingivitis is not the same thing as periodontitis, although sometimes a person may be affected by both. Gum disease is mostly caused by improper oral hygiene that allows bacteria in plaque and calculus to remain on the teeth and infect the gums. Gingivitis is inflammation of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth and is most commonly a result of poor dental hygiene. Gingivitis is a very common condition and varies widely in severity. It is characterized by red, swollen gums that bleed easily when teeth are brushed or flossed.

But there are other factors that increase the risk of developing gingivitis. Some of the most common risk factors are as follows:

  • Smoking or chewing tobacco prevents the gum tissue from being able to heal.
  • Crooked, rotated, or overlapping teeth create more areas for plaque and calculus to accumulate and are harder to keep clean.
  • Hormonal changes in puberty, pregnancy, and menopause typically correlate with a rise in gingivitis. The increase in hormones causes the blood vessels in the gums to be more susceptible to bacterial and chemical attack.
  • Cancer and cancer treatment can make a person more susceptible to infection and increase the risk of gum disease.
  • Stress impairs the body’s immune response to bacterial invasion.
  • Mouth breathing can be harsh on the gums when they aren’t protected by the lips, causing chronic irritation and inflammation.
  • Poor nutrition, such as a diet high in sugar and carbohydrates and low in water intake, will increase the formation of plaque. Also, a deficiency of important nutrients such as vitamin C will impair healing.
  • Diabetes mellitus impairs circulation and the gums ability to heal.
  • Medications such as anti-seizure medications promote gum disease(Source: medicinenet.com)

The longer that plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva. If harmful bacteria is not removed from teeth, they will begin to irritate the gums and cause gingivitis. If left untreated, gingivitis will often extend from the gums to the bone and lead to periodontitis. When the underlying bone gets infected, it will start to recede away from the teeth and form deep gum pockets. These pockets collect plaque and bacteria as they are very difficult to keep clean, and more bone loss occurs. As periodontal disease progresses into later stages and more bone tissue is lost, the teeth may eventually become loose and fall out.

Gingivitis can be prevented by proper and consistent oral hygiene. Make certain to eat a balanced diet and visit the dentist regularly. Brush your teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. As always, floss your teeth every day!

For more information on oral health and to make an appointment call, Dr. Kirtley at 317-841-1111 or visit his website dentalimplantsinindianapolis.com 

Dr. Kirtley gladly welcomes patients from Spring Hill, Beech Grove and Warren Park.

Easy Steps to Preventing Gum Disease | Indianapolis, IN

If you are a coffee drinker, you need to be extra careful. Coffee can contribute to the buildup of plaque and tartar and accelerate the progression of gum disease.

There are two forms of gum disease: gingivitis, an inflammation of your gums caused by plaque, and periodontitis, a more advanced version of gingivitis that results in a gap between your teeth and your gums. Gum disease, when caught in the gingivitis stage, can be treated and, in the future, prevented. Periodontitis, on the other hand, is more difficult to treat and, due to the gap between the teeth and gums, may cause your teeth to become loose and fall out.

Coffee affects your mouth in two ways. First, it lowers the temperature of your mouth and gums. Second, it reduces the blood flow to your gums. The combination of lowered temperature and restricted blood flow means your gums do not get all of the necessary oxygen they need to continue functioning properly.

Saliva contains oxygen and specialized enzymes which help prevent gum disease by killing the unnecessary bacteria in your mouth. However, drinking coffee can cause dehydration and reduce the amount of saliva you produce, thus increasing your chances of developing gum disease.

For more information on the prevention of dental disease, contact Dr. George Kirtley DDS at 317-841-1111 or visit his website www.smilesbygeorge.com.

 

 

Cardiovascular Disease linked to Periodontal Disease

Current research shows a link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease in some patients. Though there is not concrete evidence as of yet, health-care providers and patients should not ignore the risks gum disease contributing to heart disease.

Patients should be getting a comprehensive periodontal evaluation from their dental professional at least once a year. This should entail a full examination of teeth and gums, overall health status and age. Patients who are diagnosed with periodontal disease should inform their health care provider to reassure better incorporation of their care.

According to Pamela McClain, DDS, president of the American Academy of Periodontology , “There is no compelling evidence to support that treating periodontal disease will reduce cardiovascular disease at this time,” McClain said, “but we do know that periodontal care will improve your oral health status, reduce systemic inflammation and might be good for your heart as well.”

Schedule your next dental checkup today, don’t wait until it’s too late. Contact Dr. George Kirtley DDS at 317-841-1111 or visit his website www.smilesbygeorge.com.

Complicated Pregnancies Caused by Periodontitis | Indianapolis, IN

A new study shows that untreated periodontitis can complicate pregnancy in woman.

A study of 366 pregnant women, revealed an oral bacteria in the amniotic fluid of women whose pregnancies were complicated by preterm birth. A prior study showed that nonsurgical periodontal therapy could lower the rate of preterm birth.

Periodontitis was also found more prevalent in woman who had preterm low birth weight infants than in woman whose infants had a normal birth weight.

Hormonal changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy and menopause, cause an increase in the number of oral bacteria, which enter the blood and negatively impact on certain female health issues.

In addition to regular brushing and flossing, woman should visit the dentist at least twice a year, and more often if women are pregnant, suffer from bone loss or gum problems.

Dr. George Kirltey wants to emphasize the importance of regular dental checkups and good oral health. Contact his office today to schedule an appointment 317-841-1111. Or visit his website, www.smilesbygeorge.com.

Source: The Dental Tribune.com – The study was published in the first 2012 issue of the Oral Health and Preventive Dentistry.