Tag Archives: Dr. Gorge Kirtley

What Can You Do About Missing Teeth?

lots of smiles

If you don’t have a full set of pearly whites, don’t worry because you’re not alone. In fact, most adults have lost a couple of teeth already, either to decay or some form of accident. But, then again, you wouldn’t know, considering that most adults often sport complete smiles.

If you’re wondering how some adults have managed to hide their missing teeth quite well, then you’ve come to the right place.

Listed below are some of the tooth replacement options that you can avail at the dentist’s office.

  • Dental Implants – Dental implants are surgically implanted into your mouth, offering a sturdy and long-term solution for your missing teeth. The process typically involves three stages and can take several months to finish. However, despite how long the procedure takes, a lot of people are willing to wait because dental implants are considered to offer the best mix of both durability and comfort out of all the other tooth replacement options available.


  • Bridge – Bridges come in different types, but they’re generally dental appliance used to bridge the gap left by your missing teeth. Unlike dental implants, which are simply surgically attached to your mouth, bridge uses the adjacent teeth from your missing teeth for support, like an anchor of sorts.


  • Dentures – Dentures, basically, are removal appliances that mimic how a full set of teeth looks, as well as functions. You may be fitted with full dentures, which will basically replace all of your teeth, both the remaining and missing ones. Or, you can be fitted with overdentures, which just fit over your few remaining teeth. Either way, dentures are often recommended only to those missing just a couple of teeth. It is not uncommon for those wearing dentures to complain for the first few weeks or even months, as it takes time to adjust to these appliances.

Prevent Teeth From Falling Out

Save from the accidental trauma that may knock out a tooth or two from your mouth, it is possible to prevent the loss of teeth. And, judging by how much of a hassle either one of the three procedures stated above can be, it’s best that you try and shape up your oral routine.

For starters, you can start by thinking that age is the predominant factor, because it isn’t. Like so many other complications, lifestyle, diet and healthy practices play much bigger factors than the year we were born.

In the case of missing teeth, healthy practices via good oral hygiene is the best way to maintain good oral hygiene and in more ways than one, prevent teeth from eventually falling out. This is likely because missing teeth are usually the result of severe gum disease, a dental complication that can be prevented with regular and daily brushing, flossing and rinsing with mouthwash.

It’s also best to remember that missing teeth just isn’t bad for your look. It’s bad for your health in general.

That being said, it’s best to remember to take proper care of our teeth and give it a good “workout” every day. After all, unlike going to the gym, keeping our teeth in tip-top shape doesn’t require you to go out of your house –it may not even require you to go out of your room!

If you have missing teeth that need replacing, contact Dr. George Kirtley at 317-841-1111 or visit his website to learn more about the dental services Dr. George Kirtly offers.

Dr. Geroge Kirtley welcomes patients from Spring Hill, Beach Grove and Warren Park.

Dental Sealants | Indianapolis Cosmetic Dentist

Woman having teeth examined at dentistsTooth decay is likely to occur when food particles sit in the depressions, nooks, and crannies in and between teeth, allowing bacterial colonies to form, creating acid that eats holes into teeth. While brushing and flossing will do a reasonably good job of removing food particles from the depressions in teeth, dental sealants are a procedure used by dentists to help prevent accumulation of food in the depressions of teeth in the first place.

Dental sealants are a thin plastic coating painted onto the chewing surfaces of teeth – typically molars or premolars – to help keep food from settling within the bite surface. Dental sealants bond to the bite surface, providing a protective surface between the tooth and the food, so that patients are even less likely to experience tooth decay. Because sealants can not only keep food out, but also prevent treatment of existing decay, dental sealant is typically a procedure applied to young patients – often children and teenagers in their most cavity prone years (6-14).

The process for applying sealants is fairly straightforward. First, teeth are thoroughly cleaned and dried. An acidic solution is used to roughen the surface of the enamel to allow the sealant to properly bond, and then teeth are rinsed and dried again. Finally, the sealant is painted on in a thin layer, and hardened with a special light used to cure the plastic. Properly applied, a dental sealant can protect the bite surface of teeth for up to 10 years.

If you have children in the cavity prone age ranges, or if you’re concerned about tooth decay on rear teeth that are difficult to brush, ask your dentist about dental sealants. They may not be an option for every patient, but your dentist will be able to advise you about whether or not you or your children are good candidates, as well as informing you of the cost and time frame of the procedure.

For more information on dental sealants and to make an appointment call, Dr. Kirtley at 317-841-1111 or visit his website dentalimplantsinindianapolis.com 

Dr. Kirtley gladly welcomes patients from Spring Hill, Beech Grove and Warren Park.

Dental Crowns & Bridges | Indianapolis Cosmetic Dentist

teeth whiteningAre you in need of dental work and wonder what types of options you will have when planning dental procedures. If a tooth has a very large area of decay, can it be saved? What happens if the tooth is cracked through the middle? If the pulp of the tooth can be felt prior to going to the dentist, does that mean the entire tooth needs to be removed?

While the best answer to these questions will come from your dentist, two likely options that will be presented are crowns and bridges.

Dental crowns are often chosen when the original tooth is compromised – either weakened from decay, broken, or otherwise unable to maintain itself without assistance. Dental crowns are custom-made – molded to match your existing tooth and fit your normal bite – out of a variety of strong materials such as steel, resin, and porcelain. Like the name suggests, a crown is a shell that goes on top of the rest of the tooth – like a hat on a head, the crown fits snugly atop the base of the tooth, providing an artificial bite surface that is stronger and harder than the natural tooth.

Unlike dental crowns, dental bridges are used in cases where the underlying tooth can not be saved. Where a crown is affixed to a single tooth to provide strength, a dental bridge is used when the tooth in question must be fully removed. Like a crown, it will be designed by your dentist to match your existing teeth and bite, and then constructed in a lab. Unlike a crown, it will not sit atop a single tooth, but is generally attached to neighboring teeth (usually one tooth on each side of the removed tooth), providing a fake tooth surface where the missing tooth would have been.

While crowns and bridges are typically only presented as options for patients with significant damage to one or more teeth, they are fairly common. Bridges and crowns are typically recommended as necessities, and as such, insurance will likely cover a portion of the cost. With proper care, bridges and crowns can last 5-15 years, or more, and will allow the patient to chew, drink and speak normally for many years.

For more information and to make an appointment call, Dr. Kirtley at 317-841-1111 or visit his website smilesbygeorge.com

Dr. George Kirtley welcomes patients from Spring Hill, Beech Grove and Warren Park


Yellow, stained teeth ruining your smile? Tooth whitening is the answer! | Indianapolis, IN

Are you tired of having yellow, stained teeth, despite your strict daily dental hygiene? You are not alone. There are millions of people suffering from the same problem. So if you brush, floss and visit your dentist regularly then why are your teeth still discolored? This happens because the outer layers of your teeth get stained over the years by consumption of  beverages with caffeine, soda, wine and smoking. When these outside sources of staining are left to sit on the teeth all day until your next brushing, the dentin on your teeth becomes yellowish or darkened. The best way to help your stained discolored teeth is professional tooth whitening.

Contributing factors to yellowing, stained teeth:

  • Tetracycline based antibiotics used before the age of 8 years old
  • Excessive exposure to fluoride as a child
  • Internal  bleeding due to trauma
  • Discoloration due to a health condition
  • Natural aging- as time goes by enamel gets thinner and thinner and will get a yellowish hue
  • Soda
  • Wine
  • Smoking
  • Caffeine

Simple rules to live by to try and stop the yellowing process:

  • Visit your dentist regularly for teeth cleanings
  • Rinse your mouth out with water several times throughout the day
  • Use toothpaste with whitening agents

One of the best ways to whiten your teeth is to visit your dentist for professional tooth whitening. You deserve a beautiful white smile. Contact Dr. George Kirtley for more information on tooth whitening and keeping your teeth white and healthy, 317-841-1111 or visit his website www.smilesbygeorge.com.



Cardiovascular Disease linked to Periodontal Disease

Current research shows a link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease in some patients. Though there is not concrete evidence as of yet, health-care providers and patients should not ignore the risks gum disease contributing to heart disease.

Patients should be getting a comprehensive periodontal evaluation from their dental professional at least once a year. This should entail a full examination of teeth and gums, overall health status and age. Patients who are diagnosed with periodontal disease should inform their health care provider to reassure better incorporation of their care.

According to Pamela McClain, DDS, president of the American Academy of Periodontology , “There is no compelling evidence to support that treating periodontal disease will reduce cardiovascular disease at this time,” McClain said, “but we do know that periodontal care will improve your oral health status, reduce systemic inflammation and might be good for your heart as well.”

Schedule your next dental checkup today, don’t wait until it’s too late. Contact Dr. George Kirtley DDS at 317-841-1111 or visit his website www.smilesbygeorge.com.