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How do I take care of my new Porcelain Veneers? | Bloomington, IN

Once you achieve that picture perfect smile with porcelain veneers, you need to be sure to take good care of them. According to Dr. George Kirtley of Indianapolis, IN, Dental problems take their toll on veneers, so taking care of your teeth and gums is essential. Veneers are attached to your actual teeth, which means gum and hygiene problems can greatly affect the veneers.

Polishing

One way to keep your porcelain veneers at their best is to polish them. You can have your teeth and veneers polished once every three to four months. Special tools will be used to buff and clean your teeth and veneers thoroughly. In addition, regular brushing and flossing and regular dental visits will keep your veneers looking great for years.

Mind food and Activities

Even though porcelain veneers act like regular teeth, they cannot withstand excessive pressure. Always try to avoid biting on hard bones, holding things between your teeth, or even chewing finger nails. Also, chewing ice can be extremely damaging to your teeth and veneers, chipping or breaking them. If you engage in sports, always be sure to wear a mouth guard.

How Long Do They Last?

Porcelain veneers are made of a bonding material that does not wear down easily. With proper care as noted above. Veneers can possibly last your entire life. One of the many reasons porcelain veneers are one of the most popular options for smile makeovers.

For more information on porcelain veneers or to make an appointment call, Dr. Kirtley at 317-841-1111 or visit his website www.smilesbygeorge.com.

 

 

Porcelain Veneers – Beauty and the Teeth

Barely past seven on a Tuesday morning and courtesy of the Haleyon, she’s just swallowed. Connie is drifting into a fuzzy world somewhere between sleep and consciousness. Reclining in a green dentist’s chair under a soft plaid blanket, she’s listening to a muted jazz CD over headphone. The tips of her black shoes and the hem of her gold corduroy pants peek out from under the blanket.

Wearing a smart black twinset, the fiftyish Connie (not her real name) is thin and pretty in a mildly weathered way, her tanned and freckled face formed with wispy ginger-colored hair. She’s not here to get a cavity filled or to hear a lecture about flossing. Technically, there’s nothing wrong with her teeth at all. Connie is about to get her smiled fixed.

Kirtley, the state’s only dentist accredited by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, estimates that 70 percent of his patients – mostly middle-aged women-come for what he calls “smile design.” Like other dentists, Kirtley offers teeth-whitening, but bleaching stains can do only so much. If you really want to see dramatic results, the biggest gains come from adding material to existing teeth, as in bonding or porcelain crowns, or from deconstructing the teeth and giving them a prettier facade. These were once known as caps, but in today’s parlance, they’re “porcelain veneers.”

The Artistic Side of Cosmetic Dentistry – Dr. George Kirtley

Are you a mechanic, an artist or a doctor? Or are you all or part of these? Comprehensive aesthetic dentistry is the fusion of art, physical science and psychology. The beautiful smiles and successful treatment created are created not by chance, but by an understanding of these concepts.. It is recognition that aesthetic dentistry and the synergy of our individual senses is what defines completeness in our cases. It is the difference between cosmetic and aesthetic.

First, let us attempt to understand the dif­ference between aesthetics and cosmetics. In other words, aesthetic dentistry is an integral part in establishing a synergy, a contribution to beauty of the total face when considered with­in the context of the face rather than the en­hancement of one part. How does dentistry ac­complish that? Would not just bleaching teeth that are misaligned result in the enhancement of the total face? From the artistic viewpoint and true to the meaning of aesthetic, the an­swer would be no. You would now have only shade enhanced (whiter) teeth that could draw closer attention to the compromised alignment and proportions. In the cases shown, each patient first stated they wanted their teeth to be whiter. Their question was, ‘Doctor can you bleach my teeth to make them whiter?’. Although this would at times be argued by the inexpert patient and sometimes dentist as an improvement it would not be totally worthy of being labeled comprehensively aesthetic. Aesthetics has been defined as restitution of form and function in harmony with a biologic environment. It considers the whole scene not just the individual parts within it. Aesthetic dentistry is an effort to imitate nature and if properly orchestrated, it yields a result that is harmonious with what surrounds it. It is truly an art form.

Cosmetic, by its own definition is: something superficial, to cover a defect. Nowhere does it allude to consideration of what exists around it or what is artistically beautiful.

Art has the ability to elicit sensory respons­es. Dental art when combined aesthetically with that which surrounds it can elicit sensory response. The sense of touch or feel and the visual sense are all stimulated by the presence of a func­tionally aesthetic smile. Perhaps the most no­table sense, which in art is sometimes known as the sixth sense, is the sense of emotion. This manifests in a tremendous way when we see the aesthetically compromised patient come to tears when they receive their new smile. We see it when the patient no longer covers their mouth when they speak or when they laugh. We see it in the response of others who view the aesthetic transformation of their friend or loved one. The sense of emotion is released and it is because of what is physically viewed and felt.

Comprehensive dentistry is a cliché touted and overused in our profession. Although the in­tent of its use is admirable, the understanding of its meaning I believe is sometimes ambigu­ous. To enter into the realm of aesthetics, of facial aesthetics in particular, one must realize the unchallengeable psychological influence on the success or failure of treatment planned or rendered. Addressing this entity must be in­cluded in the definition of comprehensive if it is truly to be so. How many times have those of us in our aesthetic dental careers placed what we have thought to be an amazing aes­thetic result only to have the patient respond in an unenthusiastic or negative manner.

First and most important, you must be able to deliver the goods promised. In other words, are you capable? Have you commit­ted yourself to the highest level of learning to provide the mechanical/functional and artistic skills that you have declared yourself capable of? And, perhaps, most importantly what ef­forts have been made preoperatively to involve the patient in the choices of their treatment outcome?

The patient who brings in the picture of their favorite movie star/celebrity and says, ‘I want a smile just like theirs’, can set the stage for failure if you say OK and cannot deliver no matter how nice the outcome you perceive. If the smile request by the patient is impos­sible to attain, then we must convey to them in some way what can be attained within the context of their inherited facial form. No other method of communication to accomplish this is better than accurately produced computer generated imaging.

If we are to claim ourselves as ‘Cosmetic Dentists’ then maybe, whitening of teeth in some fashion need be our only tool and more correct to the title bestowed. But, if we claim ourselves to be artists of the smile and truly concerned with optimum aesthetic, functional and psychological results within the context of the entire face and being of the patient, then the title of ‘Comprehensive Aesthetic/Restorative Dentist’ would be more appropri­ate and fair to those who are committed to this level of education.

Article source: Aesthetic dentistry today January 2007

Porcelain Veneers for Chipped or Gapped Front Teeth

Porcelain veneers can change the shape, color, length, or width of your teeth. A veneer is a thin, semi-translucent sheet of porcelain that is custom crafted by an expert ceramist and then permanently bonded to your teeth. While veneers are not suitable for every patient, they are the most aesthetic alternative for a variety of dental conditions involving the front teeth. These conditions include spaces between teeth, broken or chipped teeth, stained or washed-out fillings, permanently stained or discolored teeth that cannot be bleached, or crooked teeth.

One of the great advantages of veneers is that only a small amount of tooth structure is removed during the procedure resulting in a healthy “natural” look with little or no discomfort during the procedure. Another advantage is that the procedure usually takes only two visits. Veneers can last indefinitely when taken care of properly. They are also more resistant to stains and chipping than regular bonding.

Dr. George Kirtley, DDS in Indianapolis, IN uses state-of-the-art techniques to apply your porcelain fillings and maintain a natural appearance for your dental care.