Tag Archives: Gum disease

Easy Steps to Preventing Gum Disease | Indianapolis, IN

If you are a coffee drinker, you need to be extra careful. Coffee can contribute to the buildup of plaque and tartar and accelerate the progression of gum disease.

There are two forms of gum disease: gingivitis, an inflammation of your gums caused by plaque, and periodontitis, a more advanced version of gingivitis that results in a gap between your teeth and your gums. Gum disease, when caught in the gingivitis stage, can be treated and, in the future, prevented. Periodontitis, on the other hand, is more difficult to treat and, due to the gap between the teeth and gums, may cause your teeth to become loose and fall out.

Coffee affects your mouth in two ways. First, it lowers the temperature of your mouth and gums. Second, it reduces the blood flow to your gums. The combination of lowered temperature and restricted blood flow means your gums do not get all of the necessary oxygen they need to continue functioning properly.

Saliva contains oxygen and specialized enzymes which help prevent gum disease by killing the unnecessary bacteria in your mouth. However, drinking coffee can cause dehydration and reduce the amount of saliva you produce, thus increasing your chances of developing gum disease.

For more information on the prevention of dental disease, contact Dr. George Kirtley DDS at 317-841-1111 or visit his website www.smilesbygeorge.com.

 

 

Woman’s Fertility Linked to Oral Health | Indianapolis, IN

According to a fertility expert in Stockholm Sweden, research shows that gum disease can potentially lengthen the time it takes a woman to become pregnant by an average of two months.

In the study they analyzed data from over 3,400 pregnant women from Western Australia. They found that women with gum disease took two months longer on average to conceive than women without gum disease (seven months instead of five). Non-Caucasian women appeared to be the group most affected. They were likely to take more than 12 months to become pregnant if they had gum disease.

Researchers say all women that are about to plan a family should see their general practitioner to make sure they are in good health. In addition, they are now recommending all women should see their dentist to have any type of gum disease treated and make sure they are in good oral health before trying to conceive.

The study also confirmed additional negative influences on a woman’s time to conceive; being over 35 years old, being overweight and a smoker. In addition, the study also demonstrated conclusively that treatment of periodontal disease does not prevent pre-term birth, and the treatment does not have any adverse effects on the mother or fetus during pregnancy.

Contact Dr. George Kirtley to make an appointment to ensure your dental health is not compromised. 317-841-1111 or visit his website www.smilesbygeorge.com.

 

Content source: DentalTribune.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cardiovascular Disease linked to Periodontal Disease

Current research shows a link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease in some patients. Though there is not concrete evidence as of yet, health-care providers and patients should not ignore the risks gum disease contributing to heart disease.

Patients should be getting a comprehensive periodontal evaluation from their dental professional at least once a year. This should entail a full examination of teeth and gums, overall health status and age. Patients who are diagnosed with periodontal disease should inform their health care provider to reassure better incorporation of their care.

According to Pamela McClain, DDS, president of the American Academy of Periodontology , “There is no compelling evidence to support that treating periodontal disease will reduce cardiovascular disease at this time,” McClain said, “but we do know that periodontal care will improve your oral health status, reduce systemic inflammation and might be good for your heart as well.”

Schedule your next dental checkup today, don’t wait until it’s too late. Contact Dr. George Kirtley DDS at 317-841-1111 or visit his website www.smilesbygeorge.com.